Protection

Protecting Images and Using Images in WordPress

Protection

The questions I get asked are:

  • How do I keep people from using my images?
  • Why can’t I save this image from this site?

This article on WPMU Dev is excellent. It covers:

  • Image copyrights and registrations
  • Disable right-clicking
  • Disable hotlinking
  • Metadata
  • Watermarks
  • Preventing access to media
  • Monitoring and Taking Action
  • WordPress Plugins

Usage

We go to these great lengths to protect our work, but are we equally vigilant about not using others’ work illegally? Be careful that you are!

It is important to note that any images used within PDF documents data shared online are subject to copyright laws too. I had one client dinged for an image in an internal & archived newsletter that wasn’t even publically available via the website anymore! It was still online, but it was via a private link. It still counts! Just be careful – even with internal documents.

If you don’t have permission, please get it or don’t use the image/media.

One of the best resources for finding images to use online is via Google image search utilizing the Tools to narrow your search to those licensed for reuse. This is based on the Creative Commons (CC) licensing.

Conduct your search, and then click on the Tools button:

Tools for Google Image Search

Then, click on the Usage rights down menu:

Usage rights options on Google Image search

Finally, select the appropriate CC license:

Select CC License of images on Google Image search

In this case, I selected “labeled for reuse” – that’s commercial or non-commercial use. Since this is a business website, I cannot select non-commercial. If I were working with one of my non-profit clients, then I could select one of the non-commercial options.

There are other free and free-to-use resources for great imagery on your websites. There are, of course, great paid sources of imagery as well. I’ve worked with a handful of all these other options, but I keep going back to Google images for its simplicity.

With all of my websites and media, I strive to deal honestly with image sharing, use, and the like. Not only is it the right and lawful thing to do, but in the long run, it’s easier and cheaper to honor copyright protections.

Google Captcha (reCAPTCHA) Plugin for Added WordPress Security

The Google Captcha (reCAPTCHA) plugin is one way to boost site security and reduce spam. It adds a very simple to use reCAPTCHA checkbox to all forms (or some forms as you see fit). Installation and setup is very easy, and the options are straight-forward. I especially like that you can add this feature to the login page and the comments forms. Plus, you can exclude logged in users by role – even custom roles!

Google reCAPTCHA Plugin Options

The premium options you can buy into are nice to have, but are not necessary to make the plug-in work like a champ on basic sites.

You can get the plugin on WordPress.org to install manually or search “Google reCAPTCHA” through your WordPress [Add New] plugin screen. The plugin is by BestWebSoft.

Update 6/27/16:
So, I’m not overly fond of the latest update. It includes an updated menu (BWS Panel) that is moved to the top complete with an over-large icon that messes up the flow of the admin menu. The “improved” menu screen would probably be great if I subscribed to their services and used other plugins, but I just want the one free-version for now. I don’t appreciate this particular type of in-your-face up-selling. If you don’t mind all of the extra baggage and/or you intend to “go pro,” then this is still a great plugin to use. As of today, pro membership (access to all their plugins) is $40/month and $17.95/year for the one plugin.

A great-so-far alternative is the GNA Google reCAPTCHA.

What Pages are Popular on Your Site?

This is an instructional piece for finding your website’s most popular pages for the past 30 days utilizing Google Analytics.

#i: Log in, and get to your website’s Google Analytic’s dashboard.

#1: Select Behavior > Site Content > All Pages from the left-hand menu.

Behavior > Site Content > All Pages

#2: In the upper-right of the screen, is a pull-down for the date range settings. The last 30 days is the default date range. However, you can select any number of different options from the Date Range drop-down.
#3: Click on the Apply button to update the results to any changes you made.

Set Date Range

#4: Below the graph, there’s click on “Page Title.” This option simply makes the table below easier to read.

Page Title Selection

#5: The default is to show 10 results. If you need to see more than that, select a larger number from the “Show rows:” drop-down. This option is on the bottom right of the results table.

Show More Results

#6: If you’re just looking to know, you’re done! If you need this information for reports and whatnot, make a selection from the Export menu at the top of the page.

Export Google Analytics

 

Playing with Fonts

I’m finally getting something together for thebucks.org, and I found myself very lost in the world of fonts. Google does it again! I love their Fonts. It’s a fun interface to play through and experiment with, and it was super easy when I finally settled on the font I wanted to use.

I got the design from another favorite site to visit and browse through for ideas: Free CSS Templates This is the first time I took one of their designs and just used the thing as is. Sometimes, it’s just an idea here or there. Fantastic site.