Protection

Protecting Images and Using Images in WordPress

Protection

The questions I get asked are:

  • How do I keep people from using my images?
  • Why can’t I save this image from this site?

This article on WPMU Dev is excellent. It covers:

  • Image copyrights and registrations
  • Disable right-clicking
  • Disable hotlinking
  • Metadata
  • Watermarks
  • Preventing access to media
  • Monitoring and Taking Action
  • WordPress Plugins

Usage

We go to these great lengths to protect our work, but are we equally vigilant about not using others’ work illegally? Be careful that you are!

It is important to note that any images used within PDF documents data shared online are subject to copyright laws too. I had one client dinged for an image in an internal & archived newsletter that wasn’t even publically available via the website anymore! It was still online, but it was via a private link. It still counts! Just be careful – even with internal documents.

If you don’t have permission, please get it or don’t use the image/media.

One of the best resources for finding images to use online is via Google image search utilizing the Tools to narrow your search to those licensed for reuse. This is based on the Creative Commons (CC) licensing.

Conduct your search, and then click on the Tools button:

Tools for Google Image Search

Then, click on the Usage rights down menu:

Usage rights options on Google Image search

Finally, select the appropriate CC license:

Select CC License of images on Google Image search

In this case, I selected “labeled for reuse” – that’s commercial or non-commercial use. Since this is a business website, I cannot select non-commercial. If I were working with one of my non-profit clients, then I could select one of the non-commercial options.

There are other free and free-to-use resources for great imagery on your websites. There are, of course, great paid sources of imagery as well. I’ve worked with a handful of all these other options, but I keep going back to Google images for its simplicity.

With all of my websites and media, I strive to deal honestly with image sharing, use, and the like. Not only is it the right and lawful thing to do, but in the long run, it’s easier and cheaper to honor copyright protections.

Evernote

6 Ways Evernote Embraces Handwriting – Evernote Blog

At Evernote, we see the benefits of both the digital and analog spaces and we’ve spent a lot of time developing features that connect the two. You can tap notes directly into Evernote, but it’s also just as easy to snap a photo that instantly makes your handwritten words digitized and searchable.

Source: 6 Ways Evernote Embraces Handwriting – Evernote Blog

  1. Search handwriting
    I use this all the time. I also love that it searches inside PDF documents too.
  2. Evernote Moleskine notebooks
    I have one of these! It was worth it just for the quality journal and the year of Evernote premium. *I purchased mine long before their recent payment structure changes. I haven’t looked to see how things are offered now.
  3. Evernote for Android
    This is literally my most used app. I use the document camera all the time to help reduce the paperwork pile. #1 on that list of paperwork is receipts!
  4. Jot Script Evernote Edition Stylus
    Never tried it. It looks like a slick stylus. My current stylus is challenged by the fact that it takes AAAA batteries. Those are hard to find! All the same, I prefer writing on paper than on my tablet.
  5. Post-it Note Camera
    This could be expanded to include “document camera” – it smart recognizes and does OCR on post-its, business cards, and other documents differently than “just pictures.”
  6. Penultimate
    I’ve never tried this because I do not have any iThings.
  7. LiveScribe Pen
    They didn’t list this one, but it is a tool I use in conjunction with Evernote all the time! I love this pen. It has one drawback in the latest version regarding the ink, but overall I still have huge love for this pen that allows me to write pen to paper and then export those pages to PDF in Evernote with the Livescribe app. Easy peasy!

What Pages are Popular on Your Site?

This is an instructional piece for finding your website’s most popular pages for the past 30 days utilizing Google Analytics.

#i: Log in, and get to your website’s Google Analytic’s dashboard.

#1: Select Behavior > Site Content > All Pages from the left-hand menu.

Behavior > Site Content > All Pages

#2: In the upper-right of the screen, is a pull-down for the date range settings. The last 30 days is the default date range. However, you can select any number of different options from the Date Range drop-down.
#3: Click on the Apply button to update the results to any changes you made.

Set Date Range

#4: Below the graph, there’s click on “Page Title.” This option simply makes the table below easier to read.

Page Title Selection

#5: The default is to show 10 results. If you need to see more than that, select a larger number from the “Show rows:” drop-down. This option is on the bottom right of the results table.

Show More Results

#6: If you’re just looking to know, you’re done! If you need this information for reports and whatnot, make a selection from the Export menu at the top of the page.

Export Google Analytics

 

Take a Closer Look, Be Safe

A few days ago, a close friend told me that someone tried to steal their email account! To add to that scare, I was recently forwarded a scam offer that looked legit until I looked a little closer. I decided to take these two warnings and post a few bits for you to look out for too.

Be aware and be safe.

What to look for on the website:

  • Does the site URL (in the address bar) match the site you THINK you are on?
    Not sure? Do a Google search for the site you think your on and compare the URLs.
  • When you click on the back button or try to close the window, are there a bunch of intentionally misleading pop up boxes asking you to stay?

What to look for in that email:

  • Does the from address match what you expect? (info@e.bay.com is not the same as info@ebay.com)
  • If suspicious, go to the website referenced in the email separately from the email. In other words, open the browser and either use your own bookmark, type in the URL, or Google the company.
  • If you are told to make a phone call to your bank (or a company). Don’t use the phone # in the email. Use the phone number published the bank/company website (that you went to independently of the suspect email).

A couple of the sites I reference are:

Basic Security

  • Make your passwords long
  • Use different passwords for different sites
  • Don’t share you passwords on websites, with tech support, through emails, or on post-it notes.
    (if you’d like to keep track of your passwords, use a secure method like keepass)
  • Change your passwords from time to time
  • Answer security questions with fake answers (social media makes those pretty easy to hack these days!)
  • Check and adjust your privacy settings on all social media periodically